Association of High Blood Pressure with Body Mass Index, Smoking and Physical Activity in Healthy Young Adults



George Papathanasiou1, *, Efthimia Zerva2, Ioannis Zacharis2, Maria Papandreou2, Effie Papageorgiou3, Christina Tzima4, Dimitris Georgakopoulos5, Angelos Evangelou6
1 Department of Physiotherapy, Technological Educational Institution (TEI) of Athens, Greece
2 Department of Physiotherapy, TEI of Athens, Greece
3 Department of Medical Laboratories, TEI of Athens, Greece
4 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Greece
5 Department of Cardiology, “P & Aglaia Kyriakou” Childrens’ Hospital of Athens, Greece
6 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Greece


Article Metrics

CrossRef Citations:
0
Total Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 832
Abstract HTML Views: 739
PDF Downloads: 243
Total Views/Downloads: 1814
Unique Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 482
Abstract HTML Views: 434
PDF Downloads: 172
Total Views/Downloads: 1088



© Papathanasiou et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Physiotherapy, Technological Educational Institution (TEI) of Athens, Greece;, Tel: +306942408757; E-mail: papathanasiou.g@gmail.com


Abstract

Introduction:

The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between resting blood pressure (BP), smoking, physical activity (PA) and body mass index (BMI) in Greek young adults.

Materials and Methodology:

A standardised questionnaire and the Greek version of IPAQ-short were given to 1500 randomly selected health science students, in order to record smoking behaviour, PA status, BMI and resting BP. All healthy young adults aged 19-30 years old were eligible. The final size of the study cohort was 1249 students (522 men).

Results:

Males’ BP was 129.2/77.0 mmHg, significantly higher than the females’ values of 119.9/73.4 mmHg. Approximately 17% of the total population were classified as overweight and 3% as obese. In the overall population, smoking prevalence was 35.2%, with 15.3% being heavy smokers (≥21 cigs/d). Smoking prevalence did not differ significantly between sexes. The prevalence of health-enhancing PA (high PAclass) was only 14.0%, while 42.8% of the study population were classified as insufficiently active (low PAclass). Of the three lifestyle risk factors examined, only BMI was significantly and directly associated with systolic and diastolic BP levels. The prevalence of hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) was significantly higher in men compared to women, and in obese and overweight participants compared to normal-weight subjects. Smoking and categorical PA (PAclass) were not correlated with BP. Continuous vigorous PAscore was significantly and directly associated with systolic BP, but only in males.

Conclusion:

BMI was significantly and directly associated with resting BP in both sexes. Smoking prevalence and PA status were not associated with BP in this sample of Greek young adults.

Keywords: : Blood pressure, body mass index, obesity, physical activity, risk factors, smoking.